The PhilaLandmarks Historical Homes

Lovingly preserved and maintained, these beautiful historical homes offer a glimpse into the life of both everyday and extraordinary Americans in the 18th and 19th centuries. Perfect for concerts and receptions, you'll love the opportunity to hear historically informed performances on period instruments, along with lectures, refreshments, and more.

 Hill-Physick

Hill-Physick

HILL-PHYSICK HOUSE

Medical Drama. Great Wealth. Marital Scandal.

Built in 1786, this square, four-story brick house is the only free-standing Federal townhouse remaining in Society Hill. Don’t miss Dr. Physick’s pioneering surgical tools on the second floor—bloodletting instruments, stomach pumps, clamps, and tubes to remove kidney stones, and more. You will also learn about the birth of American soda and may sample a bottle of Dr. Physick’s Black Cherry soda. Yum!

 Grumblethorpe

Grumblethorpe

GRUMBLETHORPE HOUSE & GARDENS

Horticultural Magnificence. Scientific Curiousity. And that Blood-Stained Floor. 

Sally Wister’s teenage diary was made ever more dramatic by the battles of the American Revolution taking place near her family’s home. "John Wister’s Big House,” a quintessential example of Pennsylvania German architecture, was occupied by British Brigadier-General James Agnew in 1777, just a few days before the Battle of Germantown. He received a fatal shot in his back as he turned to escape. Agnew’s soldiers carried him back to the house, where he subsequently bled to death on the parlor floor. (Yes, the stain remains!)

 Powel

Powel

POWEL HOUSE

Political Intrigue. Influence. Sinful Feasts.

Famous Visitors during the Powel residency included George & Martha Washington, Benjamin Rush, Benjamin Franklin, the Marquis de Lafayette and John Adams, who wrote of his enjoyment of a "most sinful feast" after a particular visit.

 Historic Waynesborough

Historic Waynesborough

HISTORIC WAYNESBOROUGH

Brandywine Country. A Family Refuge. And a "Mad" General. 

When Irish immigrant Captain Anthony Wayne arrived in Pennsylvania with his family in 1724, he was likely looking for a bit of peace in the land he purchased in Chester County after his valiant service to William of Orange at the Battle of the Boyne.